Posts filed under ‘upcoming shows’

Human Ottoman: Cello & Vibes Get Amped Up

Human Ottoman plays March 18 at The Starry Plough (Berkeley) and March 19 at Art Boutiki (San Jose).

Human OttomanFarang (self-released, 2015)

human-farangFirst, because I don’t want it lost too far in the shuffle: Jordan Glenn’s trio, Wiener Kids, is playing at The Starry Plough (Berkeley) on the abovementioned March 18 show. Their sax-sax-drums combo is always a treat, mixing whimsy with serious improvising — I wrote about it back when. Always a treat to see them.

That’s what caught my eye at first. But it turns out that another act playing that night is Portland, Ore.-based Human Ottoman, and that’s what this post is about.

I found out about Human Ottoman in 2014 via the music-review blog A Closer Listen. A cello-vibraphone-drums trio with occasional rock distortion and a jazzy vibe? I was intrigued enough to give their album Power Baby a try, and I liked it.

With Farang, Human Ottoman has turned the corner to become an out-and-out rock band. Jazz was always an arm’s reach away on Power Baby, with a straight vibes sound, cello-as-bass rhythms, and the occasional world-music turn. The distortion, the aggressive drums, the occasional vocals — they were all there on Power Baby, it turns out, but my brain kept slapping a “jazz” label on the music (albeit modern, attitude-laden jazz).

Farang leaves no doubt, as the distortion, the vocals, and Susan Lucía’s hard-pounding drums are all unleased to do maximum damage. Half the album, including the two opening tracks, consists of out-and-out rock songs with lyrics and everything. “Infernal Mechanisms of Commerce” has Matthew Cartmill (cello) and Grayson Fiske (vibes) turning up the distortion for a dark, driven sound that reminds me of the two-cello indie rock band Rasputina. Their instruments darken with curls of synth or guitar smoke.

Lucía’s dominates many tracks — the insistent pounding of “Denim Enigma” or the world-music influenced “Painting” and “YDKWH.” The latter track, relentless and in-your-face, is a good taste of the band and their attitude. Check out the video.

 
The jazzy side of Human Ottoman really does exist, though. I didn’t imagine it. Modern, indie-style jazz is still in the mix, in the odd-time prog/jazz beat of “3(5)+4” or the tumbling, uptempo rhythms of “Codename: Fulano.”

Finally, note that Human Ottoman’s March 19 show is in San Jose, at a comic book store near downtown. It’s a neighborhood that’s seen occasional attempts at starting something cool and artsy. I haven’t visited in a while, and I’m anxious to see what Art Boutiki has going on.

March 13, 2016 at 6:34 am Leave a comment

Alex Jenkins Trio

Alex Jenkins Trio will perform on Feb. 15 at Studio Grand (3234 Grand Ave, Oakland), opening for the Ross Hammond Group.

Alex Jenkins TrioJumping Ship (self-released, 2015)

jenkins-lessonsJumping Ship is an easygoing inside-jazz session with rigorous drumming by the leader, Sacramento-based Alex Jenkins. The interplay of the sax-bass-drums trio is strong and always performed in service of the straightforward, friendly construction of the tunes.

The simplicity is attractive. “For Laura” might be the strongest composition on the record — not a fiery one, but a compelling melody with a plaintive intensity, where the theme feeds directly into some spiraling and dancing sax twirls by Jacam Manricks. Bassist Gerry Pineda also gets showcased on the track, first with an unaccompanied intro and then with the best of his solos on the album, a passage that’s brief but densely involved. Jenkins caps it off with a nifty solo of his own.

The album opens with “Lessons Learned,” a straightahead composition where the hook is a lone heartbeat-skip bar of 5/4 — catchy, once you latch onto it. “Slither” is an upbeat groove driven by simple sax riffs in a buzzy, forceful tone. It’s anchored by Jenkins laying down a gritty groove with a bit of funk. The title track features Manricks’ flute spinning a lightly mysterious melody that starts with a slow, grand Persian feel.

Jenkins gets to show off on two short solo tracks. “Djemke” is a springy display on hand drums, while “Dedication” has him preaching from the drum kit.

As often happens in jazz, the record leaves you wondering if the band can dial it up a notch in a live setting — such as Jenkins’ regular gig at Sacamento’s Shady Lady saloon. They’ll get a chance to show Oakland their stuff on Feb. 15, playing at Studio Grand as part of the ongoing Oakland Freedom Jazz Society series.

You can find Jumping Ship on CDBaby. Here’s a bit of “For Laura,” including some of the main theme and the introductory part of Manricks’ solo:

February 8, 2016 at 8:43 am Leave a comment

Chicago’s Kahil El’Zabar Is Coming to Vallejo

vallejomap-smallVallejo is a Bay Area bedroom community, one of many outposts well east and north of San Francisco that have grown as housing costs spiral beyond the reach of most working people. It’s also one of the spotlight victims of the 2008 housing crash.

As Vallejo recovers, an organization called Jazz Remedy is trying to shore up the city’s artistic chops. They’ve arranged to have Chicago percussionist Kahil El’Zabar bring his Ethnic Heritage Ensemble into town for a concert on Wednesday, Feb. 3. The band will include Hamiett Bluiett on baritone sax and Craig Harris on trombone, so this is a pretty hefty dose of jazz being laid down on Vallejo — hopefully the community will respond.

There’s a campaign running on Indiegogo to help with expenses.

Jazz Remedy is led by Joette Tizzone, who organized many creative music concerts during the ’90s and ’00s under the moniker Jazz in Flight. I never met her, but I enjoyed many a show that she organized.

As for El’Zabar — he plays a rich brand of jazz steeped in the tradition, music of world peace and harmonious thinking. You can find a lot of his output on Delmark Records, and here’s just one example of his musical direction, an earthly jam that includes some rhythm playing by violin.

And here’s a trailer for Be Known, a 2015 documentary about El’Zabar filmed by a childhood friend and billed as a “warts and all” profile.

January 16, 2016 at 1:52 pm Leave a comment

Viv Corringham, Greek Songs, and Electronics

Vocalist Viv Corringham is in the Bay Area this week, joining up with a local band to perform a combination of improvisation, electronics, and Greek rembetika singing.

vivc-australia-2

Source: VivCorringham.org

Rembetika, also spelled rebetika and technically the plural of rebetiko, is an early 20th-century Greek music with genes from the Baltic region and Eastern Europe. But it’s not music born of joy; like the blues, it’s the music of a downtrodden people (outcasts from Asia Minor) and the struggles they faced.

Drugs seem to be a prevailing theme in rembetika, which explains the name of Corringham’s mini-tour: “Life Is Clearer Seen Through Smoke.”

The line comes from a 2011 album, Rembetronika, that pairs Corringham’s singing with the side guitar of Mike Cooper, backed by electronics and joined in spots by legendary British improv players.

Rembetronika — available for free at archive.org — gives you a taste of what to expect from Corringham’s tour. Despite the electronica-sounding title, the album is rich with acoustic sounds of strings and voice, the electronics serving as shading to heighten the drama. (We’re talking laptop-style electronics, not electronic dance music, although a downtrodden dance beat does appear on at least one track.)

Corringham’s Bay Area consort will be an experience beyond that album. The band is all woodwinds — shakuhachi, recorder, and didgeridoo — plus electronics and piano. It’s also going to be a multimedia event, with on-the-spot “film and light abstractions” by Anna Geyer.

You’ve got two more chances to see them:

Tuesday, November 24, 8:00 p.m., Center for New Music (55 Taylor St., San Francisco)

Wednesday, November 25, 7:30 p.m., Canessa Gallery (708 Montgomery St., San Francisco)

Joe Lasqo (playing laptop and keyboards in the band) has blogged a more detailed explanation of the band, the music, and Ms. Corringham.

rembetronika-3011

As for that “clearer through smoke” line — it comes from one of the few Rembetronika tracks sung in English, “White Powder.” And it’s a tough story: a plea for drugs so that the singer can find some escape from this hellish world. “Like is clearer seen through smoke,” Corringham sings, summarizing what seems to be the prevailing attitude in rembetika.

It’s not much different from blues songs about alcohol. It seems there’s something universal about misery and the human condition.

Against those lines, a gentle ramble of off-rhythm guitar drifts like a cloak of madness settling on the singer. Those kinds of unsettling moments are a highlight of Rembetronika. As another example, “Bournovalia” drenches Corringham’s voice in old-timey reverb, backed with a ghostly procession of electronic smudges and untuned chimes for an unsettling effect.

The acoustic sounds of guitar and voice remain at the forefront, though. Pairing a high-toned lilt (think the golden age of radio) with Cooper’s cowboy-style slide guitar — which isn’t the same as the traditional bouzouki but flavors the sound richly.

Those natural sounds take the foreground on the mournful “San Ton Exoristo,” backed by the crackle of faux vinyl and comet-tail slashes of background sound. “Smyrneiko Minore” adds Chris Abrahams’ tumbling, bluesy piano, some slashing guitar, and Corringham’s bright, clear voice singing a wavering, haunting melody. It’s very much the blues.

November 24, 2015 at 1:03 am Leave a comment

Whole Lotta Ornette Goin’ On — Saturday

How much Ornette Coleman can you take? Myles Boisen has organized an Ornette Coleman tribute for the afternoon and evening of Saturday, Sept. 26, at Berkeley Arts (2133 University Ave., Berkeley).

ornette-inallIt promises to be a great sampling of local artists and a full celebratory evening, from 4:00 p.m. to whenever. Don’t sleep on the Jon Raskin set that concludes the festival. Raskin is a member of ROVA Saxophone Quartet and certainly has lots to say with his horn.

Here’s the program, as copied from BayImproviser.com:


Ornettology big band, led by Myles Boisen
featuring Steve Adams – saxes
Phillip Greenlief – saxes
Chris Grady – trumpet

Sheldon Brown Trio:
Sheldon Brown – saxes
Richard Saunders – acoustic bass
Vijay Anderson – drums

Steve Adams/ Scott Walton Duo:
Steve Adams – saxes/ flute
Scott Walton – acoustic bass

MiniWatt String Trio:
Myles Boisen – guitar
Jon Preuss – guitar
Joh Ettinger – violin

Steven Lugerner Quartet:
Steven Lugerner – Saxophone
Danny Lubin-Laden – Trombone
Matthew Wohl – Bass
Britt Ciampa – Drums

Rob Ewing/ Jason Levis Duo:
Rob Ewing – trombone
Jason Levis – drums

Jon Raskin – solo sax.

September 26, 2015 at 1:00 am Leave a comment

ROVA & Saxophone Special

ROVA Saxophone Quartet will pay homage to Steve Lacy with a performance of his album Saxophone Special on Wednesday Sept. 16 at the Center for New Music (55 Taylor St., San Francisco).

Lacy is the band’s collective hero and was also a friend. And for them, Saxophone Special stands out in Lacy’s catalogue because it’s a saxophone quartet album, recorded from a one-time concert with three other sax players, guitar, and synthesizer. The “three others” aren’t just others — they’re giants of the improvised music genre: Evan Parker, Steve Potts, and Trevor Watts.

Released by the Emanem label in 1976, Saxophone Special was one of the albums that “led to the formation of Rova in 1977-78,” according to the band’s press blurb.

The Sept. 16 concert, with Kyle Bruckmann on electronics and Henry Kaiser on electric guitar, serves as both an encore and a warm-up, because ROVA performed Saxophone Special once already, in July, and is scheduled to record its own version of the album next week.

Saxophone Special is out of print — both the orignal LP and Emanem’s expanded CD version. Close to its orbit, however, is the newly reissued ROVA album Favorite Street, a 1984 collection of Lacy tunes. Here’s a link to that album on eMusic.

Sax Special Card_08.2015

September 13, 2015 at 8:37 am Leave a comment

microspoke and the Day of Noise Archive

Here’s a new Bay Area duo in the “lower-case” vein of quiet improvisation. Quoting directly from the Bay Improviser calendar:

Thu 5/21 9:30 PM Studio Grand [3234 Grand Ave, Oakland]

microspoke is a new duo project from Phillip Greenlief and Tim Perkis that uses quiet, microscopic noise as a landscape to explore highly detailed electro-acoustic improvisation. the duo made their west coast premiere at this year’s KZSU’s Day of Noise.

… Here’s the awesome part: KZSU recorded the 2015 Day of Noise and posted all 24 hours to archive.org. So you can get a preview of microspoke. They’re No. 28 on the program, listed under Greenlief and Perkis’ names.

It’s a half-hour set, sometimes prickly and abrasive, especially from the saxophone side, and sometimes calm and ambient. Actually, “ambient” might be the wrong word, considering the music changes character and direction readily — this is a dynamic set of improvisation, using the light touch of restraint to keep the mood spectrum on the contemplative side.

Skip to around 13:20 for a nice passage that surges to a high point, then retreats back into small sounds. When Greenlief moves into small scribbles, Perkis responds with some rubber-band sine-wave noises — a nice choice that displays his ability to wring musicality out of his laptop sounds.

Go have a listen to microspoke and more: https://archive.org/details/kzsudayofnoise2015.

And yes, the duo will be playing on May 21 in Oakland, as noted above. Also on the bill is the trio of Amy Reed (electric guitar), Phillip Greenlief (woodwinds), and Shanna Sordahl (cello and electronics).

May 6, 2015 at 9:52 am Leave a comment

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