Vicky Chow and the One-Bit Army

January 24, 2015 at 3:22 pm 1 comment

Tristan Perich [Vicky Chow, piano] — Surface Image (New Amsterdam, 2014)
Vicky Chow (Tristan Perich) -- Surface Image (New Amsterdam 2014)“One-bit electronics” refers to a speaker that either beeps or doesn’t. Only one tone is possible, and it’s on or off — much like the bell on an Apple II computer or IBM PS/2, if anyone remembers those.

Put a bunch of one-bit speakers in a room, set to different tones, and you’d have a programmable music box. Set those tones to a bright, minimalist major/suspended chord and play them really fast, and you’d have a hyperkinetic, jumpy music box — and a captivating, forceful musical experience, if you did it right.

Now add a pianist who can either augment or cut across the flow — and you’ve got Tristan Perich’s “Surface Image,” where pianist Vicky Chow does battle with (or leads the march of) 40 one-bit speakers all chattering away for a little more than an hour.

As you can see in the preview video, it’s an assault of bright, insistent tones blasting forth.

At its peak, the music is a maximal minimalism. It’s in your face, bouncing you around like a bumper-car ride. I think the piece is best experienced in one sitting — yes, your attention wavers, but as it does, your experience shifts from a pinpoint shower (lots of individual notes hurtling forth) to a shimmering haze (everything blurring together).

That first half really is fun, with Chow and the electronics playing in an upbeat frenzy with a stiff rhythm. It feels light even as Chow bears down on the keyboard, hammering away at marshmallow-puff harmonies or playing impressive runs against the speakers’ pulsing. The inevitable change of mood is a welcome break, though, one that’s key to molding the music into a story. It’s a story with a mostly predictable trajectory (hey guess what: it slows down in the second half), but it’s a good one, and the conclusion was not really what I’d expected.

The one-bit speakers are split between the listener’s left and right stereo speakers, so when they really get going, there’s an odd sensation of the left and right sides blinking on and off in opposite phases. (Fans of Bang on a Can, of which Chow is a member, might recall the Louis Andriessen piece “Hocketus.”) It’s an interesting effect that makes you wonder what the piece would be like in a live performance — especially one like the SF Tape Music Festival, with speakers around the room.

For a more academic yet still captivating example of one-bit electronics, in a venue where your exact location really matters, check out Perich’s 1,500-speaker microtonal wall:

Entry filed under: CD/music reviews. Tags: , , , , , .

Fieldwork in the 2010s Stumbling Upon Marc Hannaford

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. markweiss86  |  January 30, 2015 at 3:44 pm

    jerry hannan, who collaborates with sean penn, who played a jazz musician on film, tonight in menlo park: Musician to recreate Portola expedition, using car, guitar, original songs, social media, wry wit

    |   | |   | |   |   |   |   |   | | Musician to recreate Portola expedition, using car, guit…Marin-based troubadour Jerry Hannan today and tonight will tip his hat to Portola, who in 1769 left San Diego with 50 men and 50 mules, sought Monterrey Bay — th… | | | | View on markweiss86.wordpre… | Preview by Yahoo | | | |   |

      From: Memory Select: Avant-jazz radio To: earwopa@yahoo.com Sent: Saturday, January 24, 2015 3:22 PM Subject: [New post] Vicky Chow and the One-Bit Army #yiv5003435478 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv5003435478 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv5003435478 a.yiv5003435478primaryactionlink:link, #yiv5003435478 a.yiv5003435478primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv5003435478 a.yiv5003435478primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv5003435478 a.yiv5003435478primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv5003435478 WordPress.com | Craig M. posted: “Tristan Perich [Vicky Chow, piano] — Surface Image (New Amsterdam, 2014)”One-bit electronics” refers to a speaker that either beeps or doesn’t. Only one tone is possible, and it’s on or off — much like the bell on an Apple II computer or IBM PS/2, if ” | |

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